Tagged: Religion

Miscellany

Since I missed last week’s Friday Quick Takes (and all the weeks prior for ages), I’m compiling my own list here, link up free.

I’m not trying to brag or anything… but you’re welcome.
Just kidding.
 
Here in Wisconsin it’s typical November weather… oops, I mean April. Right, it’s the same thing.
One day I’m running in shorts and a T-shirt, and the next I’m back to wearing my fleece tights to work (and bed, honestly).
 
On skirts.
I gave this a try a while ago, and I couldn’t do it.
But now, without any official announcement or decision, I am pants-free during the work week for three+ weeks. This is my the beginning of my fourth week.
I think I just did it, and kept doing it, and not having a goal to check in on actually helped. I just wore skirts. It was actually quite simple.
 
On the man.
We have both talked (repeatedly) about how to remain pure in our relationship. It’s… kind of… working.
OK, it’s not working as well as I want, but we have drawn some lines, and we haven’t crossed those lines, and we’re working on ways to avoid being close to those lines (meaning, we’re working on not putting our selves in a situation that would allow us to do things we don’t want to do).
We have been official (“I guess”) for a few days past three weeks, but it feels way longer. In a good way. And I’m glad I still feel this crazy attraction to him – I want to be with him and hold his hand as much as when we started dating (I know, it hasn’t been a long time at all), and I want to talk to him about everything in my life.
I’m still holding some things back, protecting my heart and working on trusting God with my future.
When I think about my past, I think about that story of the little girl whose father bought her the fake pearls. And she loves them so dearly that he buys her a real pair, but he doesn’t tell her that until he’s begged her to trust him with her fake set. I love that story. So beautiful.
And so true, it’s so hard to let go of something “OK” because… what if there isn’t anything better?
Oh, but there is. God is better.
 
On the 28 by 28.
May 3 is fishing (if it doesn’t rain).
May 10 is Latin Mass 1 of 10.
May 17 is the 10K.
June 20 is the hot air balloon ride.
So I’m slowly but surely getting there.
The man said he’d take dance classes with me. 🙂
 
On prayer.
In March, I started saying the St. Joseph novena, and I haven’t stopped. I love it.
I immediately roll out of bed in the morning and say it. I added the Guardian Angel prayer about a week ago. I love that, too.
At night, last week, I started saying the St. Michael the Archangel prayer before I go to bed. That’s great. I don’t have it memorized yet, but I’m working on it.
I also bought a little notebook to right my prayer intentions in and to take to Mass. It’s a cute little thing. I also stuff some of my saint cards in there.
How awesome was yesterday… 4 popes! Enough people have written about that. It was fantastic.
 
On money.
Lord, help me.
 
On charity.
Lord, help me.
 
On forgiveness.
Lord, help me.
 
God bless, y’all.
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What do you think about during Mass?

I went to Mass yesterday morning (Wednesday) and here are a few of the million things that passed through my head:

  • I wonder where that guy I saw yesterday is sitting. (Shift body angle to look around)
  • Who is sitting behind me? He was an accent or something going on.
  • I hope the priest kneels when he gets the already consecrated Body of Christ… oh good. he did. I hate when they don’t do that.
  • Where do all these old women buy their coats?
  • I should have brought my Rosary.
  • Yes, I’m definitely going grocery shopping this afternoon. And I need a new can opener.
  • And lighters. And some candles. I love candles.
  • Did I turn the heat down before I left my apartment?
  • I wonder how long my cat is going to be clingy at the new place.
  • Don’t think about him (as I think about my ex-boyfriend).
  • It’s like I want to date an old man or something (because I want someone who is financially responsible and courteous).
  • My grandpa is a great man.
  • I forgot to send my grandma a birthday card! Yikes! Today is her birthday!
  • I really want to bake some bread (part of my 28 in 28 list) today… but I’m on that diet.
  • What are these clip things for on the back of the pews?
I don’t even think that’s it.
I know I was thinking about one of my coworkers during the homily.
Do you do that? Get so far off topic that you don’t even know how you got there?
Any suggestions for re-focusing myself during Mass? I know I have to re-orientate myself to daily Mass and let go of distractions, and that it’s a great exercise for me spiritually.
But… I want to focus now!
I picked up another prayer card with the Memorare on it. Oh, Mother Mary, pray for me.
God bless!

Linus: our second Holy Father

Missed the first part of this series? Find St. Peter here.

Or find all the Pope series here.

Holy Fathers copy

Make haste, and come to me before winter. Eubulus and Pudens and Linus and Claudia and all the brethren send thee their greeting.[3] 22 The Lord Jesus Christ be with thy spirit. Grace be with you, Amen.” 2 Tim. 4:21

Is it right to say that a Pope “reigns”? I’m not sure. It seems… off putting to me.
Maybe I’m just over sensitive.


Anyway, according to Wikipedia, the official second Pope of the Catholic Church is disputed.


However, I thought it was St. Linus and that’s what New Advent states, so that’s what I’m going with.
I assume there are official documents that say the real truth of it, though I don’t think they were as concerned about record keeping as we are today… or they just didn’t have the means that we do now to keep information around (forever).

St. Linus… was not a saint when he reigned.

He became a saint when he went to Heaven, obviously.


He served directly after Peter and knew Peter. He was also mentioned in the New Testament.
He was one of the close friends of the apostles. It makes sense that he was elected pope.


According to Wikipedia and their plethora of sources, Linus “issued a decree that women should cover their heads in church.” But this is also disputed.
It seems there’s not a lot of absolutes involving St. Linus.


There are many women (and Catholic bloggers) who have written about head coverings in Church. I know when I was at a Byzantine Mass, every girl and woman had her head covered except me. I was also wearing the shortest shirt, just skimming the tops of my knees.


Here are some pieces that I’ve read and found thought-provoking about head coverings: Jen @ Conversion DiaryMichelle @ Catholic Answers and veils @ Fish Eaters.


Anyway, everything I thought I knew about Linus may or may not be true. It seems no one really know.


He was “in office” (again, these terms seem so political) for about 12 years or so.


That’s all I can really share about a man who some say was martyred like St. Peter. No one knows for sure where he was buried or much about his family history.


He’s one of the Popes that kind of fades into history, like some of our U.S. Presidents do (Rutherford B. Hayes anyone?).


St. Linus is celebrated on Sept. 23


God bless! Happy October.


Come back in November for Pope Anacletus.

Learn something: Rosh Hashanah

learn something

(In this case, learn something about the Jewish roots of our Catholic faith.)

Rosh Hashanah starts this evening, Sept. 4.

For why Jewish feasts and celebrations start at sun down the evening “before” the day, go here.

Stay here to learn more about the Feast of Trumpets, Rosh hashanah, and it’s importance to Catholics.

New year

First, yes, Rosh Hashanah is a celebration of the new year… but not the Hebrew new year.

In fact, when the Israelites (the precusor of the Jews as we currently think of them) were in the Babylonian exile and Rosh Hashanah fell on the first day of the Babylonian new year.

“The first day of Tishri” Tishri being the first month in the Babylonian calender, but the seventh month of the Hebrew calendar.

According to Biblical Perspectives, the Hebrew religious and civil calendars began at different times, kind of like the fiscal new year in the United States.

If you’ve read some of the Old Testament, you’re probably familiar with all the number symbolism. Seven represents the Sabbath, the day God rested after creating the world.

So to, God created a Sabbath on the seventh month of the year.

Leviticus 23:34 says, “In the seventh month, on the first day of the month, you shall observe a solemn rest, a memorial proclamation with a blast of trumpets, a holy convocation.”

A blast of trumpets! That’s where another name for the celebration comes from the. The Feast of Trumpets.

Apples and honey

Like most holidays, there are foods and traditions that go along with Rosh Hashanah, which by the way, I was taught to pronounce as “row sha-shan-ah.” Think of the sh of Rosh and the Ha of Hashanah going together as the first two… syllables. Row, shah-shan-ah. The shah-shan-ah goes fast off the tongue.

Anyway, yes, apples dipped in honey for a sweet new year. I don’t know where I learned this, but it’s such a simple beautiful way to express this.

Instead of champagne or sparkling grape juice for my (eventual) kids, I should give them apples with honey.

There is also the traditional blowing of the shofar, the ram’s horn. It’s kind of like a trumpet… only way cooler.

Challah bread is often served to represent the cycle of the year like a ring.

(That’s the breaded bread.)

Catholic Connection

Old Testament traditions are still our traditions.

We may not celebrate our sabbath on Saturday, we may eat pork… but we still believe in the truth in the Old Testament.

Rosh Hashanah and the Days of Awe (the 10 days from Rosh Hashanah to Yom Kippur) are a very somber, serious, almost meditative time. It’s similar to a goal-planning, examination of conscience period for Jews.

We can practice that as well.

Professors take sabbaticals. We should probably examine how we’ve been doing on an annual basis. Maybe this is something to do in January, or in fall when school starts or in the spring when we’re cleaning house.

Yes, the nightly examination is good, but looking back at a year may help. Are there trends that we can only see over a long period of time? Probably.

There’s no formula for this, at least not that I know of.

But the feasts and memorials in the Old Testament and Israelite traditions shouldn’t be disregarded. They hold value for us as Catholics.

Shanah Tovah!

God bless.

Peter: our first Holy Father

Holy Fathers copy

Lord to whom shall we go?

Peter and everyone with him were completely surprised at all the fish they had caught. His partners James and John, the sons of Zebedee, were surprised too.
Jesus told Simon, “Don’t be afraid! From now on you will bring in people instead of fish.” The men pulled their boats up on the shore. Then they left everything and went with Jesus.”
Luke 5:9-11

This post took me a while to write. It’s hard to find reliable sources for our first Holy Father.
For how great the church is at keeping records (baptism records anyone?), they aren’t on the fast track to put everything on the website in English.
Some day, you know, when there are Latin teachers all over the place and I have time (read: when I make time) I might learn how to read it. Or Aramaic or Hebrew. I’ll add those to the list.
Peter. Let’s talk Peter.
Peter, the patron saint of fishermen… and bridge makers.
Simon Peter.
His brother was Andrew the apostle, and Philip the apostle grew up (or lived) in the same town.
According  to Clement of Alexandria, Peter was married and had children. Some tradition says that Peter’s wife was martyred.
Peter was a friend of (our friend) John the Baptist. Peter and Andrew were Jewish rebels hanging out with John the Baptist before Jesus showed up.
Peter was one of the first Jesus selected to become a disciple.

Then they left everything and went with Jesus.”

Oh, what a great example.

Clearly, we can learn a lot from St. Peter, our first pope. Our first Holy Father.
Matthew 16:17-19

Blessed art thou, Simon Bar-Jona: because flesh and blood hath not revealed it to thee, but my Father who is in heaven. And I say to thee: That thou art Peter; and upon this rock, I will build my Church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it. And I will give to thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven. And whatsoever thou shalt bind on earth it shall be bound also in heave; and whatsoever thou shalt loose on earth, it shall be loosed also in heaven.”

The rock and the keys really stand out to me.
Upon Peter (Cepha, rock) he built his Church. It’s interesting that people so often over look this (looking at you protestants). I guess there are different interpretations, but thank goodness we have the Church to hold on to the teachings and traditions.
Christ built his Church on Peter, and through Peter we have the Apostolic tradition. He didn’t say, upon everyone I build my Church… Upon Peter. We need our Church leaders to be Vicars of Christ for us. We need them. Christ ordered Peter to feed his sheep. We need to be feed properly.
Vatican I, Dogmatic Constitution Pastor aeternus (1870):
We teach and declare that, according to the gospel evidence, a primacy of jurisdiction over the whole Church of God was immediately and directly promised to the blessed apostle Peter and conferred on him by Christ the lord.
According to New Advent, this interpretation (the Catholic interpretation) of Christ’s words to Peter were held until the 16th century.
Church tradition holds that Peter was martyred in Rome, though there was some speculation on this.
 
Council of Ephesus, Philip, the roman legate
For “no one can be in doubt, indeed it was known in every age that the holy and most blessed Peter, prince and head of the apostles, the pillar of faith and the foundation of the Catholic Church, received the keys of the kingdom from our lord Jesus Christ, the savior and redeemer of the human race, and that to this day and for ever he lives” and presides and “exercises judgment in his successors” the bishops of the Holy Roman See, which he founded and consecrated with his blood.
I would love to know more about this man that saw our Lord die, then continued Jesus’ mission. While he may have acted cowardly and denied Jesus, he was brave and continued you on.
It really is because of Peter’s strength that we have the Church… and of course, Jesus.
God Bless!
Happy Semptember!
Looking for Pope Linus? Here you go!