Category: Teaching

Resources: The Martyrdom of St. John the Baptist

If you’re looking for information on the Memorial of the Martyrdom of St. John the Baptist…

I’ve got you covered. I didn’t have time for full-blown research for a learn something post. I apologize. This week has just been hectic for me at work and at home.

I have great news about the young adult group at my new parish… but I want to wait to share that news.

Here’s a bunch of great sources for information on St. John the Baptist.

First, the Catechism of the Catholic Church:

523: St. John the Baptist is the Lord’s immediate precursor or forerunner, sent to prepare his way. “Prophet of the Most High”, John surpasses all the prophets, of whom he is the last. He inaugurates the Gospel, already from his mother’s womb welcomes the coming of Christ, and rejoices in being “the friend of the bridegroom”, whom he points out as “the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world”. Going before Jesus “in the spirit and power of Elijah”, John bears witness to Christ in his preaching, by his Baptism of conversion, and through his martyrdom.

Prepare the way for the Lord…

I don’t have a strong devotion to St. John the Baptist, though it’s easy to see why one could develop such a devotion. (there’s an idea if you don’t have one)

The seat of my archdiocese is at St. John the Evangelist (another name for St. John the Baptist).

Here’s a New Advent post about St. John the Baptist.

Something on the unreliability of Catholic tradition… at least on specific dates: (from New Advent)

“The date of John the Baptist’s death, 29 August, assigned in the liturgical calendars can hardly be relied upon, because it is scarcely based upon trustworthy documents. His burial-place has been fixed by an old tradition at Sebaste (Samaria). But if there be any truth in Josephus’s assertion, that John was put to death at Machaerus, it is hard to understand why he was buried so far from the Herodian fortress. Still, it is quite possible that, at a later date unknown to us, his sacred remains were carried to Sebaste.”

Of course, the Bible doesn’t have any dates in it or anything. You know, they kind of missed that in writing things down.

I’m really not a stickler on dates. As long as it comes around about the same time every year… once a year, I’m good.

Here’s an article on Catholic Online.

Check out Catholic Bloggers, Jen @ Conversion Diary and Catholic Cuisine for more about this great memorial. No reason not to celebrate every time we can! I’m sure as the day turns into tomorrow (the memorial) there will be more posted online.

God bless.

I hope my week settles down soon. I’ll have more this Friday and this weekend.

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The end

I have 96 days left in the Army Reserve.

Yes, that’s right. I’m almost done. I’ve been counting since it was 365 days.

It’s kind of a big deal.

 

I remember when I left for basic training.

I wasn’t afraid of the running, the shooting, the danger.

I was worried about the unknown. Would I find some friends? Someone to talk to? Would I be able to do what they expected me to? Would I be able to do it without crying?

I didn’t know what I was getting into. I admit that, now. I wasn’t really prepared.

I don’t think you can be prepared for something like that.

Life isn’t about preparing for every possible outcome or experience. It’s about going through with strength even when something surprises you.

For example, the first time I shot a gun, any kind of gun, was my 21st birthday. No one knew, except my battle buddy, that it was my birthday. No one knew and so someone that didn’t like me, she threatened me. I still remember what she said.

“I’ll cut you.”

What a crazy, ridiculous thing to say to someone, regardless of the situation. “I’ll cut you.”

She was one of those crazy-brave women. You know the kind I mean. She had this rough, abrasive exterior, but I think it stemmed from something that hurt her.

I was crying the first time I shoot my rifle.

I was crying when my drill sergeant came back from the target and said, “You’re a pretty good shot. You did really well.”

Then, I wasn’t crying anymore.

How can you possibly prepare for something like that?

You can’t.

There just isn’t a way to know that on the day you turn 21 you’ll be threatened by a crazy woman (I mean crazy here in the sense that she didn’t realize how much she could hurt someone) and then called a good shot the first time you put a real round through the chamber of an M16.

So, how do we live? How do we go through life, knowing that we aren’t going to know?

I recently got Angels Explained, a talk by Mark Miravalle. It’s amazing.

He strongly suggested we talk to our guardian angels. Did you know that your guardian angel was created with all the other angels at the beginning of time and he/she has been waiting for you?

Our guardian angels love us. And the more we talk to them, ask for their help, the more they can help, Miravalle said.

Wow.

So I am trying to start praying that simple like “Angel of God” prayer. It’s beautiful and quick, and Miravalle said it works.

In between the dishes, the laundry, the vacuuming, the wiping, scooping, writing, reading, watching… you know. In between those things, I try to talk to my guardian angel.

It’s weird. I’ll admit that. It’s crazy (in another sense of the word).

I ask him/her to pray for me. I ask him/her to intercede for me. All the ways that I plead with the Blessed Virgin, I do that with my guardian angel.

And I ask for his advice (again, like Mary). I ask for patience. I ask for him to pray for me when I can’t pray, when I don’t know how to pray, when I don’t know what to ask for.

And it works.

 

God bless.

CCC 2497

By the very nature of their profession, journalists have an obligation to serve the truth and not offend against charity in disseminating information. They should strive to respect, with equal care, the nature of the facts and the limits of critical judgment concerning individuals. They should not stoop to defamation.”

 

I found that the other day when I was perusing through the Catechism.

Interesting that it’s in there. I wonder how many other profession are explicitly stated like that.

And was even more surprised that there is a social media section in the Catechism.

 

Happy Holy Week, all. I will not be posting more for a little bit.

See you in April!

 

God Bless

682

Something beautiful happened to me.

Actually, it happens at random intervals. Something I hear or I read something that just hits me right to the core.

A few days (weeks?) ago I read Paragraph 682 from the Catechism. Wow.

Here it is:

When he comes at the end of time to judge the living and the dead, the glorious Christ will reveal the secret disposition of hearts and will render to each man according to his acceptance or refusal of grace.

Christ will RENDER TO EACH MAN ACCORDING TO HIS ACCEPTANCE OR REFUSAL OF GRACE. Wow.

We’ll be judged on how we accept God’s grace. How beautifully put.

It made me think, am I refusing Christ’s grace? Am I disbelieving in his power to forgive? Do I believe but not accept?

I know I’m unworthy. I know that I’m a sinner. But I can still accept the grace. I have to accept it. Fully accept it and thank God for it.

 

Don’t turn away from things that jump out at you like this.

Write them down, keep them in mind. Remember them. These quotes really get to to the heart of our faith.

 

God bless.

Reasons to go to Daily Mass

In an honest effort to change the bad habit I’ve started this year (I wrote about it yesterday), I set my alarm for a bit early this morning and made it to daily Mass.

And I have a story, that I’ll share another time. But I wanted to put together this list. These are not in order… except the order that I thought of them.

Ten reasons to go to daily Mass

  1. Knowing the Mass inside and out. It’s soooo easy to follow along during a Sunday Mass. There are so many people around, that if you say the wrong words during Mass no one notices. On a weekday, there are old women and some men. They notice.
  2. Reflection on the origins of the Mass. I think about this a lot, especially after reading Scott Hahn’s The Lamb’s Supper. In a daily Mass, there’s a lot less singing (usually), there’s a lot less extra glamorous stuff. It’s just the cut and dry Mass, the focus always on the Lord. It’s beautiful. It might take a while to get used to, but it’s worth it.
  3. Quiet time starting your day. Or ending it. It’s hard to get away. Mass makes it easy.
  4. It’s short. Usually about 30 minutes. A little longer if it’s a school Mass. Worth it to see kids learning the right way to participate in the Mass.
  5. Making friends and connections. We pray for each other at Mass. And when we see each other, we remember.
  6. Create personal devotions. I love the Rosary. I love it so much, I have one hanging in nearly every room of my apartment (along with other sacramental items), I have one in my jacket pocket. In the summer, I keep one in my bag and in my car. Every morning before daily Mass, a Rosary is prayed aloud at church. It helps me keep that tradition. Other devotions can be “caught” from others, too. I see people praying the Holy Father’s intentions and other global prayers. Beautiful.
  7. Get to know your priest. Daily homilies are much more personal, and usually more spontaneous than Sunday homilies. It’s because they are short and there aren’t a lot of people in the “audience.” My priest often shares personal experiences during the week that he doesn’t touch on Sundays.
  8. Get to know the Bible. You’ll hear the entire thing if you went every day. If you can’t go every day, you’ll at least get more familiar with the geography/places of the Bible and the writing itself. It’s complicated and good to hear it aloud frequently along with reading it privately.
  9. Be with the Lord. Even if you can’t receive communion, you can still be with him. Christ is present in four ways in the Mass: in the Eucharist, in the priest, in the Word of God and in the assembled people of God.
  10. Reminder to share the Gospel. I always feel great after leaving Mass. It’s kind of like feeling good after working out (or anything you love). A beautiful thing happens in the Mass, and we get to be a part of it. When we go daily, it serves as a reminder to us that we are a part of that beauty even outside the church doors.

There are probably more reasons. I know there are. But that’s a start.

God bless.